Electronic driver-assist technology makes the roads in Wisconsin and across the United States safer, according to a recent study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. In fact, lane departure and blind spot caution systems reduce the rates of single-vehicle head-on and sideswipe crashes by around 18 percent. When these types of crashes do occur, the systems reduce the rate of injuries by 24 percent and fatalities by 86 percent.

When adjustments were made for factors such as driver age and insurance risk, the IIHS study found that lane departure/blind spot warning systems decreased crashes by 11 percent and injuries by 21 percent. Previous studies have shown the systems reduce crash rates even more dramatically. For example, a 2015 study of American trucks discovered that lane departure warning systems reduced lane departure crashes by almost 50 percent. Meanwhile, a Swedish study of Volvos claimed that the systems reduced such crashes by 53 percent.

The IIHS study also revealed that blind spot detection systems made roads safer. By analyzing crash data from vehicles made by Fiat Chrysler, General Motors, Honda, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz and Volvo, the organization found the technology reduced lane changing and merging crashes by 14 percent. When crashes did happen, the technology reduced injuries by 23 percent. Other IIHS studies have found that safety technologies like front-crash prevention systems with automatic braking and rearview cameras also significantly reduce the rates of crashes.

While new automotive safety technologies prevent some crashes, thousands of serious motor vehicle accidents still occur each year. A motorist who has been injured in a car crash caused by another party may have grounds to file a personal injury lawsuit seeking compensation for damages. An attorney could help gather evidence supporting a victim’s claim and negotiate a fair settlement.