On average during 2017, nearly 30 people nationwide were killed every day in car accidents related to drunk driving. That works out to one drunk-driving traffic fatality every 48 minutes and 10,874 deaths over the course of the year across the country. Alcohol impairs the ability of drivers to safely drive motor vehicles. It is illegal in Wisconsin to drive with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 grams per deciliter of blood, but the negative effects of alcohol may be present even at lower levels.

In 2017, 1,837 people died in crashes where the BAC of a driver was between .01 and .07. BAC can be measured either by a blood test or using a Breathalyzer . The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that a BAC as low as .02 is enough to cause a decline in visual abilities or to perform divided attention tasks. At .05, the driver’s coordination is reduced, as is his or her ability to track moving objects and respond to emergency situations.

At a BAC of .08, drivers experience lessened concentration and ability to control speed. Their motor control is poor, perception is impaired and information processing capability is reduced. Roughly one-third of all motor vehicle accident deaths in the U.S. are related to drunk driving.

People who are injured in motor vehicle accidents caused by a driver who is impaired by alcohol often require extensive and expensive medical care and treatment, and in many cases they are unable to return to work during their recovery period. They might find it advisable to have the help of an experienced attorney when they are seeking compensation from the at-fault motorist.