The femur is the strongest bone in the body, but it can be fractured with enough force. In Wisconsin and across the U.S., most people who fracture their femur do so in a high-impact auto accident. Perhaps you suffered in this way but through no fault of your own. You may be able to file a claim against the responsible driver.

The nature of femur fractures

First of all, the femur can be fractured along the shaft, or midsection; at the distal end, which is at the knee joint; or at the head and neck, which attach the femur to the hip. Knee fractures and fractures of the shaft are especially common in car crashes while hip fractures tend to arise when older people fall.

Fractured femurs can leave victims with various complications like blood loss and blood clots. The muscles and ligaments in the legs can be torn, and if the bone exits the skin, it makes an infection all the more likely. Clearly, then, immediate medical attention is necessary in most cases.

Pedestrians and motorcyclists are at a high risk

Vehicle occupants at least have a metal enclosing that can absorb some of the impact of a crash, but motorcyclists and pedestrians don’t, which is why they run a higher risk for femur fractures. Fractured femurs may require metal rods and screws to reattach and straighten them. Fractured femoral necks and distal ends can be reattached through metal plates.

Victims who might suffer from an infection may be given an antibiotic intravenously or take oral antibiotics after being released from the hospital. They may undergo physical therapy and rehabilitative care in order to regain strength in their leg.

How you can seek compensatory damages

Not being at fault for the motor vehicle accident you were in, you may be entitled to compensation for your injuries. Showing how the other driver was negligent and negotiating for a settlement with the auto insurance company, though, can be difficult without legal representation, so you may want to have the assistance of an experienced attorney.